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20130129
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 6:00am EST
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:00pm EST
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 11:15pm EST
not expect to witness an election won by overinflate. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenge
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 7:30pm EST
as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and the horse are on steroids coming in to fund the campaign. but we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a minor that cared towards election and not towards governing. >> host: president gutmann come at you right to chew in your co-author, dennis thompson as we observe the changing scene in american politics, we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. why is that? >> guest: if you want to see the problem with the uncompromising mindset, look no further than the 112th congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets past the least legislation in the last 50 years. why? everybody's campaigning all the time. there's very little by way of relationships across the aisle and we ran up to a break of the debt ceiling crisis in compromise was reac
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 9:00am EST
east. but because of elections, elections, today governments across the middle east in egypt, tunisia, libya, pal stipe, turkey, iraq -- palestine, turkey, iraq, they are all pursuing at least, at least independent foreign policies which are by definition much less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states and much more open to the islamic republic of iran. simply put, today the united states is in a profoundly weaker position in the middle east, and the islamic republic of rapp is in a significantly -- of iran is in a significantly stronger position. that has essentially happened because there has been a dramatic shift in the middle east balance of power. in our book, "going to tehran," we describe how part of why this shift has and is occurring is because of mistakes in american policies in the middle east. but we also describe in our book that part of what is going on is something vastly upside appreciated in -- underappreciated in the west which are the successes of the islamic republic of iran which are also driving the shift in the regional balance of power
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 11:00pm EST
-span.org. >> millionaire investor and republican foster freeze spoke to reporters about the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. he backed rick santorum in the presidential race. this hour long event in washington, d.c. was hosted by the christian science monitor. >> okay, here we go. i'm dave cook from the monitor. thanks for coming. our guest this morning is foster, visiting our fair city from his home in jackson, wyoming, accompanied by one of his advisers, matthew taylor. he was born in rice lake, wisconsin and earned his degree in business administration at the university of wisconsin where he met his wife, lynn. he served two years as an army intelligence officer, and then he founded freeze associates, an investment firm whose funds were wildly successful. he sold a controlling interest in the firm in 2001, but remains as chairman of freeze sorts and director of randy funds, and in recent years, focused on philanthropy and political activism including being the largest donor to senator santorum's 2012 political campaign. all of that, hunting the occasional 14-foot crocodile in tan
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 1:00am EST
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 9:00pm EST
to talk about it. but with the recent election has given me gratification. our forefathers were citizens, and by the way they were all men, a favorite of the community, the elite of that society, businessmen, a successful farmers, people who had high education. and they traveled the world and learned from other cultures. they had out -- studied government from other countries from taking and choosing from the various things and do come up with creative solutions for the issues they thought had not been resolved. what i am gratified is more people are voting now than they have in the past years. it is their obligation. to not let the country just happened. but create the country they want. that is why i tell people when they ask how you feel about the immigration law? how do you feel? because they generally have cases and i don't want to people to believe i made at my mind. i haven't prettify express an opinion that is what they will believe. but having said that, what i often say is why aren't you asking yourself? what you doing about it? if you thank you don't like something? that is wh
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 8:30am EST
's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. john podhoretz -- >> podhoretz -- >> john podhoretz, you wrote a book a few years back called "bush co
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 5:00pm EST
own elections. i guess maybe you could extend further and say it's not enough to get 51%, the majority of the vote, you've got to get 60%. if you don't get that, you don't take office. what a revolutionary idea, that somehow the majority ought to be able to move legislation. but i also agree there ought to be the rights of the minority, the rights of the minority to debate, discuss, amend legislation. now, again -- again, the majority, after ample debate and deliberation, should have the power to govern, to enact the agenda the voters voted store and to be held accountable at the ballot box. i guess in other words, i guess i fun mentally believe in democrat -- fundamentally believe in democracy. maybe that's a failing on my part. i just fundamentally believe that the majority should rule with respect for the rights of the minority. now, as i've noted, a revolution has already occurred in the senate in recent years. never before, never before in the history of this senate was it accepted that a 60-vote threshold was required for everything. now, this did not occur through a constitution
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:00pm EST
. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who proved his famous time for choosing television address which made him a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shore up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom in his early chaotic days and forced some order and discipline on the blind spirits who ran the "national review," expanded the conservative movement through the tv program the advocates, his newspaper column and lectures and champion ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor turned politician. bill loved american politics, traveling to distant land, and national review's effervescent edit her bill buckley of whom he once said, quote, the most exasperating people in the world are so often the most beloved and he is no exception. david frisk has captured this and more in his sple
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 3:00pm EST
of it is to rebuild the middle class. i just don't see any social policies on the horizon -- the election is over. we have heard everything the candidates had to say. not one said anything intelligent about, this is how you rebuild the american middle class. so, little tiny book. not all that think. tells three stories. what doesn't work, and why it doesn't work, what does work, and why it does work, what could work and how to make it work. >> host: professor gelles, do you come at this from a liberal or conservative point of view? you mentioned fox news. >> guest: practical. i've worked in policy in washington. i've been a dean of the school of social policy. and i find that purple is my color. i'm not interested in taking an ideological point of view. i'm interest in results. and the danger of writing a book like this is -- i've already discovered it -- my extremely liberal friend wish i had never written the book and my extremely conservative friends which i didn't want to spend this much of the government money. if i can tick both sides off and be true to the data, then i've done the book i wante
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 11:00pm EST
don't think this is before they talk about it, but i will talk about one thing the recent elections in have any gratification about. our forefathers were citizens statesman. back then by the way they were all meant so that's why i use the word statesman. they were people who work of the community they were in. they were the elite of our society to the they were businessmen, very successful scholars. they were people who had higher education's and they actually travel the world and learn from other cultures. the constitution was written by men who had studied the government's through history and other countries and picking and choosing from the various things that they saw describing the things they felt didn't work and coming up with creative solutions for the issues they thought hadn't been resolved by others. more people are voting now than they had in past years because of worries me when the citizens for debt that it is their obligation not to let the country just happened, but to create a the country that they want. they tell me how did you feel about immigration lollies, the i
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:30pm EST
characteristic of a lot of our work. but we feel it was necessary. >> host: thomas mann, did the 2012 elections clarify anything? >> guest: by all appearances it was a status quo election returning us to the division of power; obama in the white house, democrats in control of the senate, republicans of the house. but appearances can be deceiving and in this case are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama almost like a parliamentary party was not rewarded. taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded, calling the obama health care plan -- which was their own only a few years earlier -- socialism was not reward withed. rewarded. that means they have to begin to rethink themselves and, importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition. so i think that was the important change that creates a new dynamic not that's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the campfire in washington making nice to one another. but the possibility now exists for a real
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm EST
to be a watchdog. i used to say, what start in a lap dog. so that in changing the election of the commission, and even though later we were able to get some traction push the door, growing out of the 2000 election, the voters election, the commission has never been the same since that time. so reagan in the sense succeeded in making in the body that could not listen to ordinary people or that would not listen to ordinary people. not independent. they kept trying. the commissioners felt like they should just endorse whatever the administration felt. if you're going to do that, people appointed political appointees all over government his job is to do that. your job is to monitor them. right now all those other suppression activity that took place all across the country in the whole big debate about it, the civil rights commission should have been at the center of that debate based on its history, its experience with floating and voting rights suppression and making recommendations. it was nowhere to be seen. and so what it has done is subverted the mission that was supposed to have. what it n
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 11:00pm EST
had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until he does because without his leadership, no matter what the congress cobbles together in the regard, it's not going go forward. and so, that to me is the challenge of the day. it has a significant play on our national security, our ability to fund the military so it can engage where we need it to engage. we can't solve everything through drones. and that has major implications on the diplomacy, foreign aid, and in particular because it's way down the priority list of the american spending. and so that is the overarching issue, and i have to say, absent in intervening, like we had in 9/11, it's all of a sudden that priority became number one and everybody rallied around the impee -- impetus for changing our policy. we want to do everything we can do to keep that intervening event from happening. that causes us to reorient our thin
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 9:00am EST
of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of the washington state legislature, members of our armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor mike lowry, and governor christine gregoire, and all of my fellow washingtonians, this we know, our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. but we also bear witness to rapid breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the tragedies that we have had to endure. we truly live in extraordinary times. we also live in an extraordinary state, filled with extraordinary people. where the world sees uncertainty, we washingtonians see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildr
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 5:00pm EST
against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop with what i've said, but unilateral efforts are not helpful. we oppose them coming and we -- i don't think symbolic or other kinds of efforts are what we need. we need real negotiation, we need real results, we need progress. saxby three. two weeks ago some of us returned from afghanistan seeing the operations there. you described well i think in your opening statement about the progress being made to the afghan security forces to take over. if we take back and look at iraq for a minute, some of us traveled there in a couple of years before that conflict ended, and we saw some of the build
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 7:00am EST
political seers? >> you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure and respond. so we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. .. >> when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods s and they say those words, "liberty and justice for all," that phrase should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration. and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency. and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it, because when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think that they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground. and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thinking about voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 3:00pm EST
you support in the election and he said oh wyclef jean. and i said why wyclef jean? he is an american and he speaks creole like i do, which he does. i don't know which one i'm flattering more. [laughter] and he said yes, i know but if he is american that means that when he is elected president we are all going to -- [inaudible] [laughter] he said this. in terms of the allegations which have only gotten worse with time, you know it's hard to say. there hasn't really been any substantive proof brought forward that the allegations were wrong. the allegations are mostly based on paperwork and filings or lack thereof by the irs. one of the nice things about the way businesses conducted in this clearly and clearly not without problems but at the very least there are filing agencies and oversight agencies and usually when you have done something wrong, so long as somebody is willing to look for you it's less of a paper trail. and he seems to have gotten caught up in that. you know, it's interesting when you talk to wyclef jean i think like a lot of people haitian and otherwise who come into
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 2:00pm EST
with the election of abi who wants to finally get japan out of what's close to two decades of what you might call a lost period of time. and he's come forth, as you know, with this new stimulus package which is equivalent to 116 billion u.s., 10 trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go for infrastructure, a lot to the north for earthquake area. but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. of last time i was here was to -- last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by the governor, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough. in the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so hopefully that'l
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 1:00pm EST
thoughtful readers that i read shortly after the election of president obama discussed the possibility that now finally we can move forward because they recognize this nation is capable of not only embracing blacks as americans, but electing a black man to be the leader of the most powerful nation on the planet. so i was hopeful, but it didn't last long. it's a lot of things like that that pop up. it had it not more theory than actual practical meaning. >> host: in your view, does the republican party have a responsibility to reach out to african-americans? >> guest: yes, they do. i think they fail to be quite honest. i was disappointed to hear that representative alan west from florida had a meeting on capitol hill with a group of black conservatives and invited the national committee and they didn't show out. by the pragmatic side of me understands they feel that they're going to invest time in building an electoral coalition, they probably are went to get a whole lot out of work in the black community. it is a person the political arena as they are very much into a return on investm
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 4:00pm EST
did things like bush v. gore, going out of the 2000 election with the voter suppression. but the commission has never been the same since that time. so vacant and a sense exceeded in making anybody but couldn't listen to ordinary people are that wouldn't listen to a very people and was not independent and they kept trying so they could endorse whatever the administration. i said if you're going to do that, they have officers and political appointees oliver government whose job is to do that. your job is to monitor them and tell the public what they're doing it to make suggestions for how things should be approved. right now in the most recent election, albeit tentative at pace across the country, the civil rights commission should have been at the center of that debate based on its history, experience developing and voting rights oppression and make recommendation. it is nowhere to be seen. so what it has done it subverted the mission it is to have. and what needs to happen is that needs to be converted to the congress into another kind of body or they ought to get rid o
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
weigh inherited and it will take time. in april we have our parliamentary elections and institutions will be in place. the economically at the same time we have inherited lots of difficulty and challenges. so this is the situation. we need to strike a balance between the achieving the targets of the revolution and reality on the ground. it is not easy to do what the people wanted to do without a lot of hard work. people, you know, i think this is the story across many of the arab spring countries is the expectation, there was some overexpectation i should say but the reality of the ground, we were left with a shuttered economy and it will require assistance. it will require support from those in the region and from outside the region and so we can live up to the aspiration of the egyptian people. i want to tell the people in tahrir square right now demanding the, you know, that bread, freedom, social justice, human dignity, you know, after you, you air out your voice and statement go back to work, work hard for yourself, for your people, for your family because that is the only way t
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 10:00pm EST
said i know but if he is american that means when he is elected president that means you all get a visa. [laughter] he said that. with the allegations that have only gotten worse with time, it is hard to say there is not proved that they are wrong there mostly based with paperwork for filings with the irs. then eyes way business is conducted in this country that at least there are five main agencies so normally when you have done something wrong if somebody goes to look for you have a paper trail. he seems to be caught up in that. when you talk to wyclef, a lot of people to agree he does have big dreams and he does want his organization to help life get better but that organization has been shut down. i don't know if there will be a criminal follow-up but it is pretty ugly. things did not turn out well in the end. >> with all the problems that occurred during katrina, why do think they did not do a more effective job with the engagements the president bush and clinton? that is a very good question. basically this is not the first time aid has gone wrong or not done what it was set out t
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
gambling cover in savannah, police protective houses in athens, elections fraud in the county, truck stops in rome, the mills in south georgia, state payroll padding, embezzlement of tax funds, confects for private work, nepotism from purchasing schemes such as the state board of leaks with no water. [laughter] on i could go on. many of these expos ase took place during the griffin administration which president carter can attest notoriously corrupt. they had never stolen so much. but ronald griffin was kind of day for giving sort of croak. quite a few years later she and jack and other reporters were drinking and marvin griffin said to jack you know how use to think every time i would see him walking into a press conference was a notebook, and jack said what? he said i used to think with that beady eye son of a bitch has on me today. [laughter] she used to pursue the story for the "l.a. times," and he was always -- i think we have to watch our time here so i just going to end by saying how happy i am that this book is published because she had such a wonderful career in washington it tend
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 7:00pm EST
. >> everybody got quiet. good afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our elected by the was lerman auditorium. we welcome those who are joining a some of these occasions on our heritage website. for those and house as we prepare to begin, please make sure cell phones had been turned off. it is a courtesy that the speakers to appreciate. we will oppose the program within 24 hours on our heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting our event today is steven bougie. director of r. douglass and sarah alice and center for policy studies. he previously served as senior research fellow for defense. the homeland security. he is well versed in the special area operations and cyber security areas as well as defense support to civil authority. he served for three decades as an army special forces officer in top pentagon official. in july 2001 he assumed the duties of military assistant to secretary rumsfeld and work daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years. upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense hom
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 7:00am EST
this. there'll be elections in italy and we will see how we does. but you need popular mandates to get changes really through. i'm encouraged with the ireland. they're making good progress getting back to the market but there's still a lot of problems. the latest victim is cyprus. the banks held a lot of greek paper. they ran up the deficit there, and so they are the latest bailout case that we are going to see. that each country is different, and that leads to what is the same, and that's contagion. europeans did not want to see that there was contagion at the time of greece. and no matter who you talk to with a few i think exceptions, policymakers, they thought they would be no contagion out of greece in 2010. well, we know there's been plenty of contagion. the minister of finance of germany an made a statement to a group of us in tokyo at the imf meetings there a couple months ago. when he was asked what was the biggest mistake you made so far in the european debt crisis, and he said we did not understand and did not accept the idea of contagion. and boy, europe has paid for that co
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 7:30am EST
honorable friend he was in that referendum was very much part of his manifesto of the last election. [shouting] >> in the interest of harmony i think we'll leave that to one side. >> mr. speaker, a constituent of mine with a chronic medical condition tells me that he is just 20 pounds a week to spend on food and clothing after paying his utility bills, and after april after the welfare cuts in april, he will just have to pounds a day. if the prime minister police we're all in it together, with the agreed to review the impact on the very poorest of the welfare cuts so that my constituents sacrifices are in line with his own? >> i will look very close to what the honorable gentleman says and the circumstances. let me just make the point, if you compare 2013 with 2010 in terms of the level of key benefits, it is worth making this point. and unemployed person on jobseeker's allowance is getting 325 pounds more this year than in 2010. a couple jobseeker's allowance, 500 pounds more. a single out of work mother, 420 pounds more to do with the opposition try and do, week after week, is som
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 6:00pm EST
october 23, 1988? >> guest: right. i sent the president-elect at the time a christmas card, and he was nice enough to answer me with another card. c-span: and he says in here, "yes, the truth is powerful, you have told the truth." why was he writing to you about truth? >> guest: well, we all have been so much -- because, i believe, mostly with political situations, trying to implicate that he knew more about those things -- and we always believed that the truth is powerful, and it will eventually prevail -- so he was telling me that from the note that it did prevail, the truth. c-span: you went to his inaugural, why? >> guest: oh, i am very proud to have been there. i admired the president of the united states, and i know better than anybody else what is truthfulness and what is integrity. they have been put in question by a lot of people for political reasons. c-span: how do you know better than anybody else? >> guest: because everybody accused that i told him about the camp, and i know that i never mentioned it to him or downgraded anything about the country. c-span: and this all
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 11:00pm EST
at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined work over generations and a commitment to friendship and the resolve never to revisit that dark past. a commitment epitomized by the treaty found 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget it. the abandoned checkpoints in the sense of excitement about the future. the knowledge that a great continent
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:30pm EST
we please those people who will enable us to stay here? looking at the next election to a greater and stronger. then looking at your up of office and have you do what is best for the country in the long term regardless of how affects your political career. >> is that in your view a form of corruption? >> no, i don't think it is corruption. i think it is natural human nature. the people of congress are great people by and far. well-intentioned. they love our country. they want what is best for the country, provided they can still have a say in it. and so you get the natural tension of doing what is best for the country, even though it hurts my political career. and that's a pretty tough decision. only very courageous people will do that routinely. you know, when your desire is for position and power and the original desire was well intentioned and well-meaning and you confuse or rationalize that position against standing outside of that and looking, if i was not partisan, if i was not in a political position, will be the best position to the country those to be conflicted because o
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
to change it, but the election as president of bolivia who as you know marks the real turning point in bolivia's's relations in the international community, and in terms of the government's policy towards the coca leaf. basically the administration adopted that coca yes, cocaine no approach. they eliminated the force to ratification strategy that had led to so many human-rights violations, social conflict and replaced that with a program of voluntary social control which has actually had better results than the previous policies and a better results than in neighboring peru. in 2011 there was a 13% decrease in the production in that country according to the to this government. but with regards to the international convention the government began a campaign to try to correct this historical error and the first thing they did with everyone agreed with was to try to amend the 61 convention by removing the two sub paragraphs that basically say it needs to be abolished in the 25 year period that has now patched some years ago. they simply wanted to delete those paragraphs. without any ob
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 10:00am EST
, the election of morales as president of bolivia who is a coca grower himself marks a real turning point for relations with the international community and in terms of the government's policy towards the coca leaf. they basically, the morales administration adopted a coca yes, cocaine no approach. they eliminated the forced eradication strategies that had led to so many human rights violations, violet social conflict and replaced that with a program of voluntary social control which has actually had better results than the previous policies and certainly better results than, say, neighboring peru. in 2011 there was a 13% decrease in netco ca production in that country, according to the u.s. government. but with regards to the international conventions, the government began a campaign to try and right this, correct this historical error. and the first thing they did which everyone agreed was sort of a modest effort at change was to try and amend the '61 convention by removing the two subparagraphs that basically seiko ca leaf chewing needs to be abolished during the 25-year period. they s
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 8:00pm EST
, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the sense of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, woman kind, allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the world of belief, this is my country, let us act point meanings that everyone is included. may the inherit dignity and inailble rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these floorish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and fifty years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and a history of disfranchised to today's expression of a more perfect union. we ask too, almighty, that where our paths seem blanketed by forms of presentation, and rivelled by pains of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and that the vision of those who
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 7:00am EST
the conservatives will win the next election. [cheers and applause] >> and interestingly, an interest in not raising the fact the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up why 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastest since 1989. but i answered his question very clearly. i want to see a strong britain in a reformed europe. we have a very clear plan. we want to reset the relationship. we will hold of that referendum that we were recommend that we settlement to the british people. the question now is for him. has he got a clue what he would do? >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, mr. speaker, he -- [shouting] the clues in the title prime minister's question, he is supposed to be answering the questions. [shouting] he has had six months, you said six months to think about this. it's not too much to ask. the right honorable member who is not your would say unequivocally that he would vote yes in a referendum. the children secretary who is hiding away down there, he has briefed he wants us to leave the european union. i am just asking the prime minister
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 11:00pm EST
for your remarks. you say americans fundamentally don't want big government so why do we keep electing big government? >> that is a fair question. i don't know. i saw that after the last election. when you ask them questions they don't. but unfortunately a lot of people can't integrate what that means they want to the free lunch and if they want the benefits so is the intellectual disconnect and lack of integration that is the fundamental issue where the objective arguments are more important to show them it doesn't work with negative consequences we have to show older people held that it is for their children and of the grandmother's what to do bad things to there grandchildren they have let people rationalize but in "the new yorker" you have to know anybody who writes that is so detached from reality it is hard to take them seriously but they want to think there is no problem even though the facts are there had to keep people inspired at the same time to tell people i would give used a false negative consequences. it is a harder message. everybody in here as a parent knows if your kid is
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 12:00pm EST
. it will be an in-out referendum. legislation will be drafted a for the next election. and if a conservative government is elected, we'll introduce the enabling legislation immediately and pacify the end of that year. and we will complete this negotiation and hold this referendum within the first half of the next parliament. it is time for the british people to have their say. it is time for us to settle this question about britain and europe. now, i say to the british people, this will be your decision. and when the choice comes, you will have an important choice to make about our country's desti destiny. now, i understand the appeal of going it alone, of charting our own course. but it will be a decision we will have to take with cool heads. proponents on both sides of the argument when he to avoid exaggerating their claims. of course britain could make her own way in the world, outside the eu, if we chose to do so. so could any other member state. but the question will have to ask ourselves is this, is that the very best future for our country? we will have to wait carefully where true na
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 5:00pm EST
of the scandals that broke. expos is an illegal gambling part. police protective whorehouses, election fraud and a truck stop models, marriage mills and south georgia, state payroll padding, embezzlement of tax funds, use of convicts for private work, nepotism, purchasing schemes such as the time the state brought a bunch of boats with the bottoms for lakes with the waters. i could go one. many of these expos dais took place during the griffin administration which president carter can well a test was notoriously corrupt. i think it was in the reader's digest, never had so many stolen so much. but marvin griffin was kind of a forgiving sort of kirk. he -- quite a few years later he and jack and some other reporters were sitting around drinking. marvin griffin said to jack, you know, what i used to think every time i would see you walking into a press conference with a notebook. jack said, what? and he said, i used to think and i wonder what that bsn of a bitch as of midday. [laughter] jack left the constitution in 1965 tab pursue the civil rights story for the l.a. times. and he was always --
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 12:00pm EST
, that it was decisive in the last election, women. each of these groups who played a role in electing him, that's why, in my view, when i came there for the inauguration, i said, and the day before the inauguration i did a speech to the morehouse alums who came, and i said the important date is not tomorrow. we celebrate that is the important date is the day after tomorrow. what are we going to do them? and for a lot of people -- >> host: celebrate it. >> guest: for the next four years. >> host: it is a milestone i never thought in my lifetime i was a black president. we talked a great deal about -- very little about you but i think we're getting to know you here in your comments. you ended dr. king's paper. there are several papers there. papers at boston university we would fiscal but there are other papers. how are the papers that you edited different? what did you find? >> guest: the papers i am taking, the papers of boston, the papers at atlanta, the papers of some at different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i've gone, i found papers in india. so you bring them all together and y
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:30pm EST
he's planning to be elected the attorney general of arkansas, then the governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something that everyone who knows him knows about and they talk about all the time. it's not from the university of arkansas, she goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the fallujah that goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot handle the sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women his mother directed him him to that are the duty queens and attractive and that really is where his eyes had been. so this comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham.
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:00am EST
. this was a japanese soldier who elected to stay in the jungle after the war was over. the island of guam and he stayed there with another guy until 1960. he came out 15 years after the end of the war and went back to japan as a hero and had a movie made about him and all that. by a quirk of faith i happened to find his long-lost diary actually here in washington. i went to return it to him some years later and he came back to guam and i met him and gave him back his long-lost diary out it was a very emotional thing as you can imagine. >> you looked at prisoners from the allied side in the japanese. how were they treated differently and where they treated differently? >> yes they were treated very differently. the americans of course were treated very brutally, not much food comp and not much medicine, hard labor and a lot of physical beatings. and the japanese military training which thought it was disloyal to surrender. so these american p.o.w.s were considered not honorable men and they were treated that way. on the other hand of course the u.s. treated the japanese prisoners in accord with the gene
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30pm EST
. [laughter] said this book stands with the actual election. since then camorra talked a lot about it why the republicans lost. i actually wrote a poem about back, which has called republicans soul-searching, were searching our souls and wondering why we got beat so badly our rivals are gloating. it's obvious now where our campaign went wrong. we should have prevented more people from voting. [laughter] and there was one very that the problem was as romney church victories the center, which is traditional in american politics that you appeal to the base of the party in the primary to the center. and he did try to move to the center. the second debate i wrote a poem called from abc's sword into shares and the third debate when he moved further, he said from abc shares into feather duster's. [laughter] and one of the theories is while he did the -- did that come as some people the party were preaching things most americans didn't believe in. todd akin, for instance. i did a poem called the female reproduction system, a lecture by todd akin. [laughter] a member of the house committee on scie
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 2:00pm EST
scientists say the time between election day in november and inauguration day in 11 weeks that it too short a time for a president to get ready to assume orbit? lyndon johnson had two hours and 6 minutes basically, the time in which he was sworn in on the plane, air force one, let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off of the plane ready to be president of the united states and to see him step in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm
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